Arts and Sciences Champion’s Challenge

What is the Champion’s Challenge?

Each year, the Barony of Politarchopolis selects champions in the Arts Martial and the Arts & Sciences. As it is customary for the Martial Champions to arrange for contests in their fields of endeavour, so I have attempted to do likewise as the current A&S Champion. This challenge is a non-competitive way for new and experienced artisans to celebrate their endeavours and find inspiration for further learning in the Arts & Sciences.

 

Who is the Champion’s Challenge for?
Everyone is welcome to give it a try! The Challenge has been designed with different levels of difficulty so that, whatever your level of experience, you can participate in a way that fits into your SCA journey.

 

What level should I do?
Whichever one has tasks that feel right to you! If you’re new to craft, the ‘Beginners’ category will probably fit you best, and if you’ve been doing A&S for more than five years, you probably count as ‘Experienced’, but everyone’s journey is different. You get to decide which level offers tasks that are challenging, but achievable. (And if none of them feel quite right, you can mix and match!)

How do I participate?
Complete tasks on the list in any order (to your own definition of ‘complete’), and keep a record using the checklist below, a logbook, or your own record-keeping system. At Fields of Gold, bring along your records (and anything you’ve made during the Challenge that you’d like to display) and show off your progress!

Do I have to do every task?
No – whether you do one task or all twenty-five, you are an equally valid participant in the Challenge. It’s up to you to decide when you’ve done enough. However you participate, I hope this Challenge helps you take pride in your work!

 

Yours in Service,
Lady Gwen verch David, Politarchopolis Arts & Sciences Champion

 

Download the Beginners Logbook


The Tasks – Beginners

Learning

  • Ask someone else about one of their projects
  • Go to a class on something new to you
  • Try something you’ve never done before
  • Ask for help to improve your skills
  • Practice a technique until you don’t need to look at the instructions

Researching

  • Find a picture of something you’d like to make or do and track down its source
  • Visit a big links directory and explore the section/s related to one of your projects
  • Make a list of five websites/books with information about something that interests you
  • Find a period picture/description of something similar to an object you have or want to make
  • Ask someone more experienced about something you want to learn

Making

  • Help someone else with a project
  • Alter something you own to make it more useful or more beautiful
  • Start a project using materials you have at home
  • Ask someone to help you with a project
  • Make something from start to finish

Sharing

  • Take three photos of a project as you make it
  • Write down how you made something
  • Wear or use a finished project at an event
  • Explain a project to someone else
  • Share your project online

Improving

  • Write down a mistake you made during a project and something you could do differently
  • Ask someone who’s made something similar what they did
  • Write down one thing you like about a finished project and one thing you want to change
  • Go back to a finished project and do something to improve it
  • Find or make a second item to use with a finished project

Download the Intermediate Logbook


The Tasks – Intermediate

Learning

  • Ask someone else about their research
  • Go to a class on something new to you
  • Try something you’ve never done before
  • Ask for help to improve your skills
  • Try a new application of a technique you’ve already learned

Researching

  • Find a period picture/description of something you’d like to make or do and track down its source
  • Visit a big links directory and explore the section/s related to one of your projects
  • Make a list of five websites/books about a topic that interests you which list the source of their information
  • Look closely at a period picture that interests you and write down one thing that matches what you already know and one thing that surprises you
  • Ask someone more experienced about useful sources for your current project

Making

  • Help someone else with a project
  • Modify, decorate, or repair one of your old projects
  • Go back to a project you haven’t worked on for a while and decide if you want to finish it, change it, or save the materials for something else
  • Ask someone for advice on a project
  • Make something from start to finish

Sharing

  • Take three photos of a project as you make it
  • Write a how-to guide about a finished project
  • Enter a finished project in a display or competition at an event
  • Explain how to make something to someone else
  • Share your project online

Improving

  • Write down a mistake you made during a project and something you could do differently
  • Ask someone who’s made something similar for advice on how to improve
  • Write down one thing about a finished project that is similar to what was done in period, and one thing that is different
  • Go back to a finished project and do something to improve it
  • Find or make three things that can be used together

Download the Experienced Logbook


The Tasks – Experienced

Learning

  • Discuss someone else’s research with them, or your own
  • Go to a class on something new to you
  • Try something you’ve never done before
  • Swap skills with someone – teach a skill, learn a skill
  • Try out a new technique in a field you’re familiar with

Researching

  • Find two period pictures/descriptions of something you’d like to make or do, track down their sources, and compare them
  • Visit a big links directory and explore the section/s related to one of your projects
  • Using the bibliography of a website/book that interests you, make a list of sources that could be useful for further research
  • Look closely at a period picture that interests you and write down a list of things that matches what you already know and things that surprise you
  • Ask someone more experienced about your planned approach for a current project

Making

  • Help someone else with a project
  • Modify, renovate, or upcycle one of your old projects into something more useful
  • Go back to a project you haven’t worked on for a while and either finish it, alter it, or recover the materials for something else
  • Ask someone for advice on a project
  • Make something from start to finish

Sharing

  • Take three photos of a project as you make it
  • Publish a how-to guide about a finished project
  • Enter a finished project in a display or competition at an event, with documentation explaining what you did
  • Teach a class on how to make something
  • Share your project online

Improving

  • Write down a mistake you made during a project and something you could do differently
  • Ask someone who’s made something similar for detailed feedback
  • Write a list of things you are satisfied with about a finished project, and a list of things you would change if you did it again
  • Go back to a finished project and do something to improve it
  • Make or assemble multiple items to form a single project